How A Lee Brice Song And A Truck Connects A Teen To Her Deceased Brother

By Barbara Ann - Email: barbaraann@wqyk.com | Facebook: www.facebook.com/BAWQYK | Twitter: @BarbaraAnnWqyk
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Jessica with her brother's Truck

Jessica with her brother’s Truck

I have always had a special connection with listeners about how country music touches their lives. I guess that’s why I love taking requests. There is nothing more special to me than bonding with my listeners over how they connect with a song.

Recently, I received a email about how much a certain song meant to a listener. The email touch my heart deeply. I cried, I smiled and I marveled at country music’s ability to touch people’s lives. Here’s is one woman’s story about how a country song affected her life.

“Hi Barbara Ann, my name is Jessica Dahlgren, I am a big fan of WQYK. Recently I heard a song by Lee Brice called “I Drive Your Truck”.  I just wanted to reach out and say that I’ve never been impacted by a song until I heard this one.”

Jessica and her family including her big brother "Lee"on the right.

Jessica and her family including her big brother “Lee”  on the right side of the picture.

“My brother Wendall Lee Johnson Jr. passed away in 2006 in a car crash, he was few days shy of his 29th birthday. My brother was the type of guy you would want in your corner, the type of big brother any little sister would want. I always figured he would be here, but I guess things happen for a reason. I still remember the day I saw him walking through the front door when I was three. It’s type of memory that sticks with you when your little because of how scary he looked decked out in his army uniform. He was defiantly the type of guy you wouldn’t want to mess with.”

“He was such a good guy.  I guess that’s why they say the good die young. Lee always said he wouldn’t make it to see 30 or even get married, which he never did. He also always said he would be buried in a baby blue casket. When we made the preparations the only casket available was baby blue. It kinda of felt that he was making his last joke; since he was a really funny guy. He was the type of guy that would do anything to make my family or me laugh. He was the type of guy you could never forget, and I never will.”

“When I was 16, I began to drive his red Ford truck and to this day, his empty Gatorade bottle- grape flavor-sits on the floor, his change is still in the glove box, and his dog tags hang from the mirror. Most girls my age would have hated the truck, since it had no air or heat and it was desperate need of a paint job, but driving that truck helps me feel that Lee is still here. Every now and then, I even smell his after-shave. When I drive his truck  drive I feel closer to him even more than I do when I visit his grave – I know that is straight out of the song but it is the truth! That is why I related to the song so much.”

“It has been six years since he passed and only two since I started driving his truck, but recently him not being here anymore has hit me pretty hard. Especially with graduation around the corner, he always said he would be there to see his baby sister walk.  Though I know he will be watching with the angels. I just hope I make him proud, since he made me proud without really doing anything. Having his truck in the drive way keeps his memories alive for my family.”

“When I heard this song on WQYK, I knew my brother was speaking to me. letting me know he is still with me and always will be. I know that is cliche’ but this song legitimately spoke to me, as I’m sure it has to others.”

“I have no clue how to contact Lee Brice to thank him so I figured I would message the radio station where I heard it. If you could just let him know that this song has touched another person.  I am so gratefully to him for recording this song.”

_______

“I Drive Your Truck” Lyrics

89 cents in the ash tray / Half empty bottle of Gatorade rolling on the floorboards / That dirty Braves cap on the dash / Dog tags hanging from the rear-view, / Old skoal can and cowboy boots / and an old army shirt folded in the back / This thing burns gas like crazy, / but that’s alright / People got their ways of coping / oh and I got mine / I drive your truck, / I roll every window down / And I burn up every back road in this town / I find a field / I tear it up / till all the pains a cloud of dust / Yeah, sometimes I drive your truck / I leave that radio playing / same old country station where you left it / Yeah man I crank it up / And you probably punch my arm right now / if you saw this tear rolling down my face / Hey man I’m trying to be tough,  / Momma asked me this morning / if I’ve been by your grave /  But that flag / ……. anywhere I feel you anyway / I drive your truck, / I roll every window down / And I burn up every back road in this town / I find a field / I tear it up / till all the pains a cloud of dust / Yeah, sometimes I drive your truck / I’ve cussed, / prayed / I’ve said good bye / I’ve shook my fist and asked god why / These days when I’m missing you this much / I drive your truck, / I roll every window down / And I burn up every back road in this town / I find a field / I tear it up / till all the pains a cloud of dust / Yeah, sometimes I drive your truck / I drive your truck / I drive your truck / I hope you don’t mind / I hope you don’t mind / I drive your truck  (Source: metrolyrics.com)

Do you have a story to tell about how country music effects your life? Email me at barbaraann@wqyk.com

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